Tania RUIZ GUTIERREZ

Nydala

The missing picture
Multiple projection
temporary installation.
(Work in progress- summer 2016)

People watching multi-proyection outside

Plattform artist collective kindly invites me to propose an intervention in Nydala, Malmö. The intervention is articulated with the proposal of the artist collective, which has been present for a few years in the area, and who interacts and collaborate with the local citizens.

People watching multi-proyection outside

The wall we have chosen for my intervention is so attractive that other artists have noticed it before. On the right side area, elaborate graffiti art occupies the wall. The rest is used as an outdoor gallery for a series of mysterious paintings. The four paintings on display represents different landscapes of the city of Malmö. The first one depicts the ocean and the Oresund bridge, the second one the brother neighborhood of Holma, the third one a bucolic view of a city park, the fourth one and early twentieth century view of the city. There was clearly a fifth one, but where is it, what was it?

I have proposed a series of video projections designed to fit into the existing 4 pictures and a 5th projection consisting of a series of hypothesis about the missing picture. My intention when projecting into the paintings is not to annihilate them, but to establish a dialog with them. The projections are ephemeral but will leave their imprint in the memories of the inhabitants an will drive their attention to the existing paintings.

People watching multi-proyection outside

Observing the 4 paintings, it appears to me that the intention of the Anonymous painter was to reflect about the past, present and future of Nydala, as well as about the relationship of Nydala to the rest of the city. I wish to continue and amplify these questions. How is Nydala related to the rest of the world? Why is precisely the future missing? And why does the second picture represents Holma, instead of Nydala? In fact, Nydala architecture and urban plan resembles not only to Holma but also to my childhood neighborhood in Bogota and to many others neighborhoods built in the same period, all around the world.

Those plans, all following the premises of the CIAM (International Congress for Modern Architecture) are full of unfulfilled promises, just like our childhoods. With an interwoven fictional and documentary approach, the video intervention is designed to raise a series of questions concerning the possible futures and multiple pasts of Nydala and its inhabitants.

Raising questions instead of giving answers is -more generally- one of the precepts of my work in public spaces.